Toronto's Low Income Women of Colour Struggle in Isolation: Report Finds Needs Ignored by City Hall

Wednesday, July 28 2010
Toronto's Low Income Women of Colour Struggle in Isolation: Report Finds Needs Ignored by City Hall   Women are urging candidates for the next Mayor and Council of the City of Toronto to address the needs and wishes of low-income women of colour in the City. In a new report titled "If low Income Women of Colour Counted in Toronto," they call for the City to implement concrete initiatives for change.


 

Based on discussions with more than a hundred and twenty women in nine of Toronto's low income neighbourhoods, the report finds that the women are isolated, overworked, subject to racism and discrimination, and chronically poor. Most have trouble finding jobs and most say the have nowhere to go to meet women or neighbours. Contrary to popular stereotypes of low-income people as abusers of public resources, few of them know about critical City services and supports.


 

The situation is urgent and cannot be ignored any longer, according to Report author Punam Khosla. "Women of colour are easily a quarter of Toronto's residents, too often they live on a shoestring in overcrowded and overpriced housing. In spite of this they contribute an enormous amount to our city by making the impossible, possible for their communities. It's simply not OK to let them keep falling through the cracks of public policy and public life."


 

The report calls for implementation of Eight Initiatives to Kick Start Change: "The municipal election is a perfect chance to make these issues a priority for a new Mayor and Council. It's time that low-income women of colour counted in Toronto," said Khosla.


 

Download the report, If Low Income Women of Colour Counted in Toronto, at www.socialplanningtoronto.org (click on Research & Policy Updates)

Latest news

Browse by topic